Patient Education

Bennett Podiatric Medical Center would like to be your partner in health care. Feel free to ask your questions and share your concerns with us. We will work with you to develop a wellness program for the care and treatment you need.

We welcome you to our practice and look forward to caring for you.

Bennett Podiatric Medical Center provides a full range of medical services including the following:


Wound Care and Lymphedema Treatment

Lymphedema results from insufficient drainage of lymphatic fluid in an extremity. The resultant pooling of lymphatic fluid causes the extremity to swell, which can lead to infection or ulceration. Lymphedema may be caused by any of several disease processes, or may be a congenital condition. It is also possible for lymphedema and venous disorders to exist in the same patient. When lymphedema is complicated by poor circulation, there is likely to be great difficulty in healing the patient's wounds. ...


Read More...

Website Privacy Policy

Thank you for visiting our website and for reviewing our Website Privacy Policy as follows: - We do not collect Personally Identifiable Information (PII) about you unless you choose to provide that information to us. - If you are a patient of the practice and you choose to provide PII, any PII you provide is protected by security controls consistent with {prim_practice_name} Notice of Privacy Practices (NPP). - Non-PII information related to your visit to our website may be automatically collected and temporarily stored. For more information on your health information privacy and security rights visit the NPP page. ...


Read More...

Waterproof Casting

When a bone is fractured, it is usually put in a cast for several weeks to help hold it in place so that it can heal naturally. Most casts need to be kept clean and dry in order to promote healing and lower the risk of infection or other complications. This can be difficult, however, especially where bathing and swimming are concerned. Waterproof casting lets a person shower and swim regularly, even soon after breaking a bone. Waterproof casts, which are made of fiberglass, keep the limb immobilized for optimal healing but cause minimal disruption to a patient's daily routine. Waterproof casts are also lighter and less bulky than traditional plaster of Paris casts. ...


Read More...

Warts

Warts are a common skin condition resulting from infection by one or another strain of human papillomavirus (HPV). There are several types of warts that can affect individuals of any age, but some types are more commonly found in children and some more often found in adults. Many types of warts, especially those usually found on children, disappear on their own. When troublesome, warts can be treated with medications or otherwise removed. ...


Read More...

Varicose Veins of the Feet

Varicose veins do not form only on the legs; they can develop in many other areas, with the feet being a common location. Pressure placed on the veins of the legs and feet during standing and walking can eventually damage veins, causing their valves to weaken. Weak valves can result in a backflow of blood, called venous reflux, that interferes with normal circulation. As blood pools, the walls of the veins are further stressed, eventually causing them to distend and raise the surface of the skin. Varicose veins of the feet, like other varicose veins, are not simply a cosmetic problem. If left untreated, they can lead to potentially serious medical issues, including extensive bleeding and phlebitis. ...


Read More...

Arthritis

Arthritis is a condition that causes pain, stiffness and swelling in the joints. Arthritis is commonly caused by the cartilage protecting the bones of a joint wearing down over time, or an inflammation in the lining of the joints, which in addition to pain, may result in redness, heat, swelling and loss of movement in the affected joints. Over time, joints affected by arthritis may become severely damaged. There are different types of arthritis, and depending on the cause, may affect people of different ages. Some types of arthritis may cause damage to other organs of the body in addition to the joints. ...


Read More...

Turf Toe

Turf toe, which is a sprain of the soft tissue in the main joint in the big toe, is a common sports injury. Although it derives its name from the fact that it is frequently suffered by football players who play on artificial turf, it is also a common ailment of wrestlers, gymnasts, soccer players and dancers. Turf toe is usually caused by jamming or pushing the big toe while running or jumping, which results in swelling, pain and limited joint movement at the base of the toe. Typically, the injury to the toe is sudden (a "pop" may be felt), although it sometimes develops gradually after repeated trauma. Turf toe is diagnosed by physical examination. ...


Read More...

Toe Fracture

A toe fracture, though very painful, is not usually a serious injury. Nonetheless, it must be appropriately treated to ensure proper healing. In most cases, a toe fracture, particularly of one of the small toes, can be treated nonsurgically, frequently by home remedies. At times, however, if the fracture is more severe, greater immobilization or surgery maybe required to prevent permanent damage. ...


Read More...

Tibial Nerve Dysfunction

Tibial nerve dysfunction is a condition that causes the loss of movement or sensation in the lower leg and foot. This condition occurs as a result of damage to the tibial nerve, a branch of the sciatic nerve, which supplies movement and sensation to the muscles of the calf and foot. Tibial nerve damage may be caused by trauma, nerve pressure, or nerve compression, and individuals with diabetes may be at risk for developing tibial nerve damage. Damage to the tibial nerve may destroy the myelin sheath that protects and insulates nerve cells, resulting in reduced or impaired movement impulses. ...


Read More...

Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Tarsal tunnel syndrome, also known as posterior tibial neuralgia, is a disorder of the foot that may result in significant pain. The tarsal tunnel, the canal that runs between the inner ankle and the band of ligaments that stretch across the foot, houses several vital arteries, nerves and tendons, which provide flexibility to the foot. Since the walls of this tunnel consist of either bone or tough fibrous material through which these blood vessels, tendons and nerves have to pass, the inflexibility of the walls may create a problem. ...


Read More...

Tarsal Tunnel Injections

Tarsal tunnel injections are a treatment for tarsal tunnel syndrome, also known as posterior tibial neuralgia, a condition characterized by chronic pain in the foot and ankle. Tarsal tunnel syndrome is caused by abnormal compression on the tibial nerve, a branch of the sciatic nerve that supplies sensation to the foot. Although tarsal tunnel syndrome is not a serious condition, the pain it causes can be acute. Patients may also experience sensations of burning, cramping, tingling or numbness. Fortunately, tarsal tunnel injections can provide welcome relief from these symptoms. ...


Read More...

Syndactyly

Syndactyly, the webbing of two or more fingers or toes, is the most common congenital malformation of the limbs. The unusual term for this disorder derives its name from the Greek words meaning together, "syn," and digits, "dactyl." The most common presentation of this abnormality is a bonding between the second and third toes. ...


Read More...

Stress Fractures

A stress fracture is a very thin crack in a bone that can result from repetitive stress. Playing sports or performing other activities that put repeated pressure on bones are often causes of stress fractures. Although they can happen to anyone, stress fractures are more common in athletes such as runners, dancers, gymnasts, and basketball or tennis players. Stress fractures can also be caused by diseases that weaken bones. ...


Read More...

Sesamoiditis

Sesamoiditis is an inflammation of two small bones, called sesamoids, situated below the first metatarsal joint of the big toe in the ball of the foot. Sesamoids, which are also located elsewhere in the body, are bones that, instead of being connected to other bones by joints, are connected only to tendons or are embedded in muscle. In the big toe, the sesamoids protect the tendons and help stabilize the foot during walking. ...


Read More...

Routine Foot Care

Routine foot care is especially important for patients, such as the elderly and diabetics, who have difficulty taking care of their feet or who need to pay very close attention to them for medical reasons. Foot problems can affect nearby bones, joints, muscles and skin, all of which are highly susceptible to damage. In some cases, foot problems can even affect other parts of the body. ...


Read More...

Rheumatoid Arthritis Foot Deformity

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease, caused by the body attacking its own healthy tissue. With rheumatoid arthritis, the immune system attacks the lining or membrane of the joints, which causes pain, stiffness and swelling in the joints. Rheumatoid arthritis can affect any joint in the body and often affects the ankles and feet. When the lining of the joints within the feet become swollen and inflamed because of rheumatoid arthritis, the joints may become deformed causing physical malformations of the foot. ...


Read More...

Rehabilitation for Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Tarsal tunnel syndrome, also known as TTS or posterior tibial neuralgia, is a disorder of the foot that, despite being a relatively benign condition, results in significant pain. In many cases, the pain, burning, tingling and numbness resulting from tarsal tunnel syndrome can be successfully reduced and even eliminated by physical therapy. Sometimes, however, surgery is necessary. ...


Read More...

Rehabilitation for Foot Conditions

Although the methods used to treat foot injuries vary, rehabilitation is always necessary after the initial treatment, to restore full movement and mobility to the foot and ankle and help the patient return to all usual activities. After the foot has healed from the initial treatment and patients can bear weight on the joint, a physical therapy regimen is implemented to strengthen muscles and increase mobility. Rehabilitation often takes three forms: ...


Read More...

Rehabilitation for Achilles Tendonitis

Achilles tendonitis is an inflammation of the Achilles tendon, the strong band of tissue that connects the calf muscle to the heel. This condition frequently affects athletes and occurs when excessive stress and pressure are placed on the tendon. Achilles tendonitis is usually a painful but short-lived condition. Treatment for Achilles tendonitis varies and can range from conservative treatments that may include rest, anti-inflammatory medication and ice, to surgery for more severe cases. Although the methods used to treat Achilles tendonitis may vary, rehabilitation is often necessary after the initial treatment, to restore full movement and mobility and help the patient return to all usual activities. ...


Read More...

Rehabilitation for Achilles Tendon Rupture

The Achilles tendon is the strong band of tissue that connects the calf muscle to the heel. This tendon helps the foot to point downward and assists with foot movement for walking, running and jumping. If stretched too far, the tendon can tear or rupture, causing severe pain in the ankle and lower leg that can make it difficult or even impossible to walk. An Achilles tendon rupture often occurs as a result of repeated stress on the tendon and may be partially or completely ruptured, depending on the severity of the injury. A ruptured achilles tendon may result from a fall or a sports related injury. Surgery is a common treatment for a rupture of the Achilles tendon. ...


Read More...

Rehabilitation After Ankle Fracture

An ankle fracture, commonly known as a broken ankle, involves any type of break or crack, often caused by a sports injury or a fall, in the tibia, fibula, or talus. This injury can include injury to one or more of the bones that make up the ankle joint. The more bones that are broken, the more complicated and severe the fracture is. Treatment for a broken ankle depends on the type and severity of the individual fracture, but may include wearing a cast or brace, applying ice and taking anti-inflammatory medication. Stable fractures can usually heal on their own within a few weeks, while more complicated ones may require surgery to reposition the broken bone. ...


Read More...

Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction occurs when the posterior tibial tendon of the foot becomes torn or inflamed. Commonly referred to as flat foot, this condition often results in the inability to provide support for the arch of the foot. The posterior tibial tendon is the tendon that attaches the calf muscle to the bones on the inside of the foot and ankle, and is responsible for creating the arch in the feet. This tendon provides the support that normally holds up the arch of the foot while walking. As the tibial tendon tears, individuals often experience pain as the foot gradually rolls inward and flattens. Over time, the supporting ligaments in the foot begin to stretch and tear as well. ...


Read More...

Podiatric Laser Treatments

Laser surgery is often a successful treatment for lesions, tumors and nail disorders. Laser treatments do not damage tissue in surrounding areas, are often painless, and allow patients to recover quickly. Two common conditions that are successfully treated with laser procedures are toenail fungus and warts. ...


Read More...

Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are noncancerous growths that develop on the soles of the feet. Caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), plantar warts are frequently found on the heels or balls of the feet, areas to which the most pressure is applied during standing or walking. While plantar warts are not a serious health threat, they may cause pain or tenderness and therefore need to be removed. ...


Read More...

Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is an inflammation of the plantar fascia, a band of fibrous connective tissue that runs along the bottom of the foot from the heel to the base of the toes. This band normally supports the muscles and the arch of the foot, functioning as a shock absorber, but if, after repeated stretching, it tears, inflammation and severe heel pain, exacerbated by standing or walking, result. Plantar fasciitis is the most frequent cause of heel pain and a common reason for the development of outgrowths of bone, called heel spurs, as well. It is more common in women and tends to occur as people age. ...


Read More...

Physical Therapy for Ankle Conditions

Certain conditions affect the ankle joint, causing stiffness and pain, and difficulty with walking. People with chronic ankle problems caused by issues such as ankle impingement or chronic ankle instability, or conditions such as osteoarthritis, often undergo rehabilitation to strengthen the ankle and increase its flexibility, and/or relearn how walk properly. ...


Read More...

Paronychia

Paronychia is a common, relatively benign, infection that occurs on the skin around the nails. It is typically the result of an injury to the area, as when a hangnail is picked or bitten off. Paronychia presents as a painful swelling around the nail that may include blisters filled with pus and changes to the nail's overall appearance. There are three pathogens that may be responsible for paronychia: bacteria, candida (a particular kind of yeast), and other types of fungus. ...


Read More...

Osteopenia

Osteopenia is a condition characterized by low bone mass. Although not as low as osteoporosis, osteopenia is the result of a loss of calcium and minerals from the bones. If too many minerals are lost, bones become more porous, brittle and considerably weak. Individuals with osteopenia usually do not experience any symptoms, however they may be at risk for eventually developing osteoporosis and may have a have a higher risk of bone fractures. Osteopenia becomes more common as people age, and women are more likely to develop osteopenia than men. ...


Read More...

Osteomyelitis

Osteomyelitis is an infection in a bone. Osteomyelitis is caused by an infection that develops in the bone or spreads to the bone from another area, and may result in the formation of an abscess in the bone that blocks blood supply. In children, this condition commonly affects the long bones of the arms or legs and it is more common in the bones of the spine or hips in adults. Most cases of osteomyelitis are caused by germs or the staphylococcus bacteria, that has spread from infected skin, muscles or tendons. Bacteria may be transmitted from another part of the body to the bones, through the blood. ...


Read More...

Osteochondral Lesion of the Talus

The talus is the uppermost bone in the foot that, together with the tibia, makes up the ankle joint. The top of the talus is a dome-shaped area that is completely covered with cartilage to allow for smooth, painless movement of the joint. When the ankle joint is injured, the cartilage may become torn or fractured leading to a condition called an osteochondral lesion of the talus. In severe cases, as piece of cartilage may even break off but stay wedged in place. Also known as a talar dome lesion, this condition causes pain and swelling within the ankle, and left untreated, may lead to long-term damage to the bone. ...


Read More...

Osteoarthritis of the Ankle

Osteoarthritis, a condition that causes pain, stiffness and swelling in the joints, develops over time as the cartilage protecting the bones in the joints wears down. It is the most common form of arthritis, and can affect any joint, including the ankle joint, which connects the shinbone (tibia) to the upper bone of the foot (talus). ...


Read More...

Custom Orthotics

Orthotics are shoe inserts designed to correct the way the foot moves while standing, walking, running or playing a sport. Orthotics modify abnormal foot behavior during weight-bearing activities in order to alleviate pain and protect the feet from further damage. By providing support in areas where the foot is weak and by directing its movement, orthotics provide support while helping the foot to function more normally. ...


Read More...

Open Wounds and Lacerations

An open wound involves a break in the skin or tissue that may be caused by, among other things, accident, injury or animal bite. A laceration is a type of open wound, one with jagged, irregular edges. Open wounds and lacerations typically involve bleeding, redness, swelling, pain, and tenderness. They can occur nearly anywhere on the body, with the upper extremities being a common location for open wounds/lacerations caused by accidents or falls. Deeper wounds or lacerations may require medical attention to prevent infection and loss of function, due to damage to underlying structures such as bone, muscle, tendon, arteries and nerves. Medical care for wounds and lacerations focuses on promoting healing, preventing complications and preserving function. While important, cosmetic results are not the primary consideration for wound repair. ...


Read More...

Onychomycosis

Onychomycosis (nail fungus) is the most common infection of the nails in adults; it affects toenails more frequently than fingernails. Usually, the first sign of onychomycosis is a white or yellow spot under the nail. Left untreated, onychomycosis causes a nail to thicken and become brittle. The nail may split or crumble, or even separate from the nail bed. Onychomycosis can be contagious, spreading from nail to nail or, rarely, to nearby skin. ...


Read More...

Nonunion Fracture

When a fractured (broken) bone does not heal, it is referred to as a "nonunion" fracture. Although most fractures eventually heal, either by themselves or with surgery, approximately 5 percent do not heal, or have difficulty doing so (referred to as a "delayed union"). In order to properly treat a nonunion fracture, determining its cause is essential. The most common causes of nonunion are infection; not enough blood flow to the bone; separation of the fractured ends of the bone; and insufficient stabilization of the fracture. ...


Read More...

Neuropathic Pain

Neuropathic pain is a chronic condition caused by damage within the nerve fibers, resulting in the delivery of incorrect signals to the brain. Neuropathic pain, a response to injury to the central nervous or peripheral nervous system, usually causes tissue damage. What makes neuropathic pain so difficult to treat is that it is not only chronic and severe, but unresponsive to simple analgesic relief. ...


Read More...

Neuroma

A neuroma is a painful swelling of a nerve, usually in the ball or heel of the foot. Symptoms include sporadic pain; burning, tingling or numbness of one or more toes; and a popping sensation when walking. Pain is often soothed by taking weight off the foot or by massaging the area.

In the foot, there are the long bones (metatarsals) and thin nerves running between them. The nerves split in a Y-shape when they reach the toes. If the metatarsals move abnormally, they can pinch the nerve between them, causing inflammation and, eventually, permanent nerve damage. Morton's Neuroma is the most common of this type and affects the nerve between the third and fourth toes. Neuromas may also occur after a nerve has been injured, either from a traumatic wound or from damage suffered during surgery. ...


Read More...

Nerve Conduction Study

Nerve conduction study (NCS), also known as a nerve conduction velocity (NCV) test, enables the diagnosis of possible nerve damage by measuring the speed with which an electrical impulse travels through a nerve. This test, often performed in conjunction with electromyography (EMG), allows the doctor to differentiate nervous system issues from musculoskeletal ones, and is invaluable in helping to establish the source of nerve damage, information that can be vital to effective treatment. Nerve conduction studies may be used to diagnose specific causes of nerve damages, including: substance abuse, nerve compression or various types of neuropathy. ...


Read More...

Mycotic Nail Infections

Mycotic (fungal) nail infections are very common. Although they can occur on the fingernails, they are more commonly found on the toenails, because fungus grows more readily in warm, dark, moist areas like enclosed shoes. Infected nails appear discolored, thick and brittle and may at times be painful. Mycotic nail infections most frequently appear in adults. ...


Read More...

Mucoid Cysts

Mucoid cysts are fluid-filled sacs that usually develop on or near the joints of the fingers, although the toes can be affected. Typically benign, they feel like firm, rubbery lumps, and are usually not painful unless they grow large enough to put pressure on nerves. Mucoid cysts are also referred to as mucous cysts, ganglion cysts, myxoid cysts, synovial cysts, periarticular fibromas and mucinous pseudocysts. ...


Read More...

Morton's Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful condition in which excess fibrous tissue accumulates around a nerve in the ball the foot, usually between the third and fourth toes. Patients may experience pain, burning, tingling or numbness in the foot, radiating into the toes, and often report feeling as if they are walking on a pebble. Pain may be soothed by taking weight off the foot or by massaging the area. The pain of Morton's neuroma is likely to worsen over time, becoming more severe and more persistent. The condition is found more frequently in women than in men. ...


Read More...

Mallet Toes

Mallet toe is a painful condition in which the top joint of the toe bends abnormally, creating the appearance of a mallet and making it difficult to walk. It is similar in causes, symptoms and treatment to the more common condition of hammertoe which affects the next lower joint.

Mallet toe may develop due to hereditary abnormalities, rheumatoid arthritis, traumatic injury, or the wearing of poorly fitted or high-heeled shoes. In addition to pain, patients may experience redness and swelling and the development of a corn or callus on the affected toe. ...


Read More...

Lisfranc Injury

A Lisfranc injury is a trauma to the midfoot where the Lisfranc (tarsometatarsal) joint is located. This joint enables the articulation of the middle of the foot. A Lisfranc injury may vary in severity, involving a sprain, a torn ligament, a fracture or a dislocation. Lisfranc injuries are relatively rare and frequently misdiagnosed. Lisfranc injuries occur for a number of reasons, all of which involve suffering a crushing blow, falling or twisting the foot. Causes of Lisfranc injuries may include vehicular collisions, falls and sports injuries. ...


Read More...

KeryFlex%u2122 Nail Restoration System

The KeryFlex%u2122 Nail Restoration System returns toenails that have been damaged by onychomycosis (nail fungus) to their original appearance. The KeryFlex system users polymer resins to create a sturdy, natural-looking artificial nail that covers the fungal nail in order to make it look normal. According to its manufacturer, Pod-Advance, "KeryFlex is NOT a treatment for onychomycosis or related nail disorders. KeryFlex is designed for use as a cosmetic to make a patient's nail appear more attractive." ...


Read More...

K-Laser%u2122 Laser Treatment System

K-Laser%u2122 advanced laser treatment can be safely and effectively used for a wide range of painful conditions, including those affecting the neck, back, knee, shoulder, wrist and elbow. The K-Laser system is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration, and has been used for many years in the treatment of acute and chronic pain conditions. It is designed to provide the body's cells with energy in order to repair and regenerate tissue. Using Intense Super-Pulse Technology, the K-Laser system targets deep-tissue layers without damaging the skin and surface tissues, thereby providing significant results with few or no side effects. A smaller amount of laser energy is used with the K-laser system than with continuous-wave and other laser systems. ...


Read More...

Jones Fracture

A Jones fracture, named for the doctor who first described it, is an injury to the fifth metatarsal bone of the foot, the bone at the base of the small toe. This fracture most often occurs as the result of an ankle sprain or other foot injury where the foot turns inward (inversion injury), and not as a result of direct impact to the area. Repetitive stress may also cause a Jones fracture. ...


Read More...

Corticosteroid Injections

Corticosteroid injections have been used for decades to temporarily relieve pain and inflammation in joints and soft tissues, and to relieve systemic inflammatory reactions. The advantage to injecting corticosteroid medication rather than taking it orally is that it is delivered more quickly to the affected area and often has more effective results. Corticosteroid injections are routinely used to reduce the pain and swelling of bursitis, tendonitis and arthritis. In addition, they are helpful in treating lupus, scleroderma and severe allergic reactions. Corticosteroid injections are also very effective in reducing spinal or radiating limb pain (radicular pain) when injected into the epidural space, which is between the dura, the outer layer covering the brain and spinal column, and the spine itself. When used this way, they are referred to as epidurals, which are frequently used for labor pains during childbirth. ...


Read More...

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails are toenails that have grown into the skin of the toe, causing pain, swelling and, frequently, infection. Usually, it is the corner of the big toe that is affected by this condition, although the smaller toes can also develop this problem. Ingrown toenails may occur as a result of tight-fitting shoes, a curved growth pattern of the nail itself, an injury, or improper toenail cutting. If left untreated, an ingrown toenail is likely to develop an infection and may even require surgery to remove the nail. ...


Read More...

In-Toeing

In-toeing, also known as pigeon toes, is walking with the feet pointed inward. This condition commonly occurs in babies, between 8 and 15 months, when they first begin to stand. In most cases of in-toeing, both legs are equally affected. This condition is usually diagnosed before the age of three, but is most prominent between four and six. Some children may experience pain around the knee, but most cases of in-toeing are painless and do not produce any associated symptoms. ...


Read More...

Hydrotherapy

Hydrotherapy (aquatic therapy) is a form of physical rehabilitation that uses the properties of water to help promote healing of several different conditions. Because of its natural properties, water can provide relief from the pain associated with orthopedic disorders such as arthritis, chronic back pain and bone fractures; neuromuscular diseases such as muscular dystrophy; and muscular conditions such as fibromyalgia. ...


Read More...

Specialists in Medical Care

{prim_practice_name} located in {prim_area}, {prim_state} is dedicated to providing exceptional, personalized health care for our patients. Our practice specializes in diseases that affect our patients. We focus on the prevention of these illnesses through wellness care, as well as treating chronic disorders that may arise. By creating an ongoing personal relationship with our patients, our practice is able to provide you with a health oriented means of communication throughout your lifetime. ...


Read More...

High Arches

High-arched feet are less common than flat feet but are more likely to cause pain because of the increased stress put on the metatarsals, the long bones connecting the toes to the back of the foot. Excessively high arches may be inherited or acquired as a result of orthopedic or neuromuscular disease. In addition to pain, they can cause weakness and fatigue and make it difficult to find shoes that fit. People with high arches may need special orthopedic shoes or orthotics for support when standing, walking or running. ...


Read More...

Heel Spurs

A heel spur is an outgrowth of bone, known as a bone spur or osteophyte, on the heel of the foot. Bone spurs form as the body attempts to repair damage caused by constant physical irritation, pressure or stress, and may form in various regions of the body. They develop in the heel for a variety of reasons. In many cases, the long ligament that runs across the bottom of the foot, called the plantar fascia, gets pulled too tightly and an inflammation known as plantar fasciitis results. As the body tries to repair the damage, a heel spur may form. ...


Read More...

Hammertoes

A hammertoe is an abnormally crooked, contracted toe that takes the shape of an inverted "V." This condition develops when a muscle or tendon imbalance causes the toe to buckle and eventually become stuck in a bent position. Hammertoes may occur for a number of reasons, including hereditary abnormalities, rheumatoid arthritis, traumatic injury, or the wearing of poorly fitted or high-heeled shoes. ...


Read More...

Hallux Rigidus

Hallux rigidus, meaning "stiff big toe," is a type of degenerative arthritis affecting the joint located at the bottom of the big toe (the metatarsophalangeal joint). This condition causes the joint to stiffen and become painful, eventually making it difficult to walk, stand up, bend, squat or run. Hallux rigidus may occur as a result of structural abnormalities, heredity, traumatic injury, or underlying disease conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis or gout. ...


Read More...

Hallux Limitus

Hallux limitus, also known as a dorsal bunion, is a form of arthritis in which the big toe stiffens to the point that its ability to flex upwards is significantly reduced. This stiffness, accompanied by swelling and pain around the joint, interferes with normal movement, causing difficulty in walking, standing, bending, squatting and running. While the condition is degenerative and sometimes associated with aging, it may occur in young people, especially athletes, due to traumatic injury. ...


Read More...

Gout

Gout is a form of arthritis that causes painful, swollen, red and inflamed joints. Gout is caused by a buildup of uric acid that forms crystals in the joints and surrounding tissue. Uric acid is a natural waste product of the body that is normally filtered out of the bloodstream by the kidneys and excreted during urination. Patients with gout have an abnormal metabolism that reduces the effectiveness of the kidneys, causing uric acid to accumulate in the blood. ...


Read More...

Ganglion Cyst

A ganglion cyst is a fluid-filled sac that usually forms on top of a tendon or the covering of a joint in the wrist or hand. It is the most common type of soft-tissue growth in the wrist or hand, and can develop suddenly or over time. Although usually benign and harmless, it can put pressure on nearby nerves, potentially causing pain, weakness or numbness. The cause of a ganglion cyst is unknown, although it tends to occur in people who have osteoarthritis, and in women between the ages of 25 and 45. They often develop when the soft sheath around a tendon or joint swells and fills with mucus. ...


Read More...

Gait Analysis

Gait analysis, also known as walking or motion analysis, is a comprehensive evaluation of the way an individual stands and walks. The purpose of gait analysis is to detect any abnormalities in locomotion. An individual's gait is a combination of complex functions involving use of the body's visual, somatosensory and vestibular systems. Problems within any of these systems, as well as problems in the joints involved, can lead to postural and gait abnormalities. Gait analysis, as a noninvasive method of detection, is of great value in identifying certain medical conditions, determining whether further testing is required, and illuminating possible treatment options. ...


Read More...

Fungal Infections

Fungal infections are common skin conditions that can grow anywhere on or inside the human body. Fungi release spores that can be picked up by direct contact or even inhaled. Fungal infections can grow anywhere on the body, but tend to develop in warm, moist areas such as the feet, groin and armpit area. Topically, they may cause redness, itching, burning and scaling, as well as blisters or peeling. Common types of fungal infections include athlete's foot, jock itch, ringworm and yeast infections. ...


Read More...

Functional Capacity Evaluation

A functional capacity evaluation (FCE) is a physical exam that determines a patient's ability to return to the workforce. The in-depth evaluation is performed on a patient after they have recovered from a work related injury, disease or other medical condition.

The exam usually involves the patient performing specific functional and work-related tasks that test their ability by evaluating the following: ...


Read More...

Foot Sprains and Strains

Both foot sprains and foot strains are very common injuries, occurring as a result of sports accidents, falls, or other traumas. The difference between the two types of injuries is that sprains affect the ligaments, the thick strands of cartilage attaching one bone to another, and strains affect the muscles or the tendons, thick bands attaching muscle to bone. In both cases, the patient with the injury usually experiences pain (particularly upon movement), swelling, tenderness, bruising, weakness or muscle spasms. Foot sprains, the more serious injury, may also cause possible instability of the joint, most frequently the ankle. Depending on where on the foot the injury occurs, patients may be unable to bear weight until healing takes place. ...


Read More...

Foot Nerve Pain

Nerve pain in the foot may result from damage or malfunction of the nerve itself or from pressure put on the nerve as the result of another underlying condition. Nerve pain in the foot typically affects one of two primary areas: the toe or the arch. There are a variety of causes for pain in either region. Some treatment options are effective for many different disorders. ...


Read More...

Foot Drop

Foot drop, sometimes called drop foot, is a condition in which the patient has trouble lifting the front portion of the foot during walking, causing that foot to drag along the ground. To counteract this problem, the patient may raise the thigh when walking as if climbing the stairs in order to help the foot clear the floor, a method of walking referred to as steppage gait. Foot drop can occur for a number of neurological, muscular or anatomical reasons and may or may not be permanent. ...


Read More...

Flat Feet

Flat feet (pes planus) are extremely common. While usually just a normal anatomical variation that does not result in any serious difficulties, this condition, which causes the feet to lean inward, or pronate, can cause problems over time. Infants feet are naturally flat because of the pad of "baby fat" at the instep. As they grow and begin to walk, their feet normally develop arches. For some children this does not happen and their feet remain flatter than average. While this condition is usually inherited, there are many individuals who have normal arches as children and young adults, but develop flat feet, or "fallen arches," over time. These individuals are said to have acquired flat foot deformity (AFFD). ...


Read More...

...
Read More...

{doctor_firstname} {initial}. {doctor_lastname}, {doctor_suffix} {doctor_title}

{biography} ...


Read More...

Arthrography

Arthrography is an X-ray that examines and diagnoses abnormalities in the joints.

This procedure uses fluoroscopy, a technique that injects iodine into the joint space in order to make the joint structures stand out in the image and easier to assess. People with unexplained joint pain may benefit from an arthrogram, which is most effective in detecting tears or lesions in joint structures. ...


Read More...

Diabetic Foot Problems

Patients with diabetes have an elevated risk of serious foot problems. There are several reasons for this since diabetes involves: poor circulation, a damaged immune system and the possible development of nerve damage (neuropathy). Blood circulation in the feet is weaker than elsewhere in the body to begin with because of distance from the heart and the force of gravity. Further impaired circulation in diabetic patients may slow healing to a dangerous level. ...


Read More...

Dermagraft® Human-Fibroblast-Derived Dermal Substitute

Dermagraft® dermal (skin) substitute is used to treat diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) that extend through the dermis, and have not healed in more than 6 weeks. DFUs are a common and chronic complication of diabetes. Dermagraft dermal substitute, which is made of human fibroblast cells derived from newborn foreskin tissue, helps DFUs to heal. The first step in the Dermagraft treatment process is to thoroughly clean the DFU. Then, Dermagraft dermal substitute, which contains a dissolvable mesh fabric, is placed over the DFU, and covered with a sterile dressing. According to the manufacturer's website, Dermagraft dermal substitute "helps to restore the compromised DFU dermal bed to facilitate healing by providing a substrate over which the patient's own epithelial cells can migrate to close the wound." It can be applied weekly, with a maximum of 8 treatments allowed during a 12-week period. ...


Read More...

Diabetic Foot Care

Because of their distance from the heart and because of the force of gravity, the feet and legs are more at risk for difficulties with circulation and healing than other parts of the body. In patients with diabetes, these risks are exacerbated by the disease since diabetes can lead to: impaired circulation, nerve damage (neuropathy), and a damaged immune system. Not only is the diabetic patient less able to fight off infection, but is also frequently unaware of injuries because of neuropathy and impaired vision. ...


Read More...

Debridement

Debridement is the removal of dead, devitalized or contaminated tissue from ulcers, burns and other wounds. By helping to reduce the number of toxins, microbes and other substances in a wound, debridement promotes healing and reduces the risk of infection. In conjunction with other methods, debridement is considered an essential component in the treatment of chronic (nonhealing) wounds. ...


Read More...

Corns and Calluses

Corns and calluses are thickened layers of skin that develop on the feet as a result of the skin protecting itself from friction and pressure. Corns and calluses do not often cause serious medical problems, but they may be painful, especially when walking. Many people are also bothered by the appearance of these growths, as they appear as hard, raised bumps or thick, rough areas of skin. ...


Read More...

Locations

To schedule an appointment, please contact our office directly.

{practice_name}

{addressline2}
{addressline1}
{city}, {state} {zipcode} ...


Read More...

Congenital Foot Deformities

Babies can be born with foot deformities for a number of reasons. Foot deformities may occur as a result of a genetic defect, birth trauma or developmental or positional abnormalities during gestation. Sometimes, such deformities are hereditary. They may also, in some cases, result from the toxicity to the fetus of certain medications the mother has ingested during pregnancy. ...


Read More...

Clubfoot

Clubfoot is a common congenital abnormality in which the foot is turned inward. The condition derives its name from the resemblance of the curved foot to the head of a golf club. Clubfoot is an anomaly that can affect one or both feet. It is usually an isolated condition, although it is occasionally associated with other skeletal abnormalities, such as spina bifida. While a clubfoot does not, in itself, cause pain or other symptoms during infancy, the condition must be addressed soon after birth since, left untreated, it can result in serious medical problems once the child begins to walk. ...


Read More...

Claw Foot

Claw foot is so named because of the abnormal appearance of the affected foot. A patient with this condition has a deformity in which the toe joint nearest to the ankle bends upward and the other toes bend downward in a fixed contracture. A claw foot is not necessary harmful and may not require treatment, but it can cause pain, result in development of other troubling disorders, or be a sign of a more serious underlying condition. ...


Read More...

Chronic Ankle Instability

Chronic ankle instability is a condition in which the outer portion of the ankle has a chronic sensation of weakness and constantly "gives way" during walking and other activities. While this condition commonly occurs during physical activity, it may even occur while an individual is standing still. Chronic ankle instability commonly affects athletes and is often caused by an ankle sprain that has not healed properly or by repeated ankle sprains. A sprained ankle tears or stretches connective tissues, affecting balance, and if not treated properly, chronic ankle instability and other ankle problems may occur. ...


Read More...

Cavovarus Foot Deformity

A cavovarus foot deformity is a condition in which the foot has an abnormally high arch and the heel slants inward. This condition places more weight than normal on the ball and heel of the foot during walking or standing, causing pain and instability. Usually present in childhood and often affecting both feet, a cavovarus foot deformity typically worsens over time and frequently requires surgical repair. ...


Read More...

Casting for Uncomplicated Fractures

A fracture is a break or crack in the bone that is often caused by extreme force or injury. Fractures are more common in children than adults because of their active lifestyle and pliable bones. Pediatric fractures often involve growth plates, areas of cartilage where the bones can grow. ...


Read More...

Bunions

A bunion (hallux valgus) is a common foot problem in which an abnormal bony bump develops at the joint of the big toe, causing the joint to swell outward and become painful. As a result of the enlarged joint, the big toe may become stiff and turn inward. The more deformed the joint becomes, the more it can lead to difficulty walking and to the development of ingrown toenails, corns and calluses. Although bunions are not usually a serious condition, they can be painful and unsightly. Left untreated, they will usually grow larger and more painful over time. ...


Read More...

Bunionectomy

A bunionectomy is a surgical procedure to remove a bunion, an enlarged joint at the base of the big toe. This operation also corrects hallux valgus, the associated deformity that occurs when the base of the metatarsal bone angles away from its normal position. Most bunions are treated without surgical intervention, but in cases of severe enlargement and foot deformity, where more conservative methods are insufficient to relieve pain and avert or overcome disability, a reparative operation may be necessary. ...


Read More...

Bracing

Bracing is an effective form of treatment for certain orthopedic conditions. A brace, by restricting movement and relieving pressure, promotes healing, takes weight off an injured area, and provides post-operative support. Braces are commonly used to support the spine, knee, ankle and elbow.

Bracing is often used to treat the following: ...


Read More...

Blisters

A blister, also known as a bulla, is a bubble of fluid that forms beneath a thin layer of damaged skin. The fluid inside is composed of water and protein that have oozed from the damaged tissue. Commonly, blisters form as a result of irritation caused by rubbing, such as that caused by ill-fitting or new shoes. They generally involve only epidermis, the top layer of the skin. Blisters such as these usually resolve on their own fairly quickly, and do not lead to complications or scarring. Blisters may, however, development for a number of other reasons, some of which can be more serious. All blisters should be watched because even seemingly innocuous blisters can become infected easily. ...


Read More...

Bed Sores

Bed sores (pressure sores) develop when blood to a particular area is cut off as a result of extended periods of time spent either sitting or lying down in one position. Bed sores injure the skin and the tissue beneath it, and worsen rapidly once they develop. Bony areas such as the heels, ankles, hips and tailbone are typically affected. People who are paralyzed or bedridden, use wheelchairs, or cannot adjust their positions on their own are susceptible to developing bed sores. ...


Read More...

Athlete's Foot

Athlete's foot (tinea pedis) is a common fungal infection that develops in the moist area between the toes or on the soles of the feet. It causes itching, stinging and burning, and, if left untreated, can cause the skin to peel and crack, which, in turn, can lead to bacterial infection. Athlete's foot can also affect the toenails, palms and fingers. It is caused by a variety of fungi that belong to the group "dermatophyte," which also causes ringworm, diaper rash and jock itch (dhobi itch). ...


Read More...

Arthritis

Arthritis is a condition that causes pain, stiffness and swelling in the joints. Osteoarthritis is a common form of arthritis caused by the wearing down of the cartilage that protects the bones of a joint. Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune condition caused by an inflammation in the lining of the joints. Both forms of arthritis cause pain, tenderness, and swelling, and may result in loss of movement in the affected joints. Over time, joints affected by arthritis may become severely damaged. Arthritis occurs more frequently in older individuals, however it sometimes develops in athletes from overuse of a joint or after an injury. It can however, affect people of any age, including children. ...


Read More...

Ankle Strain

An ankle strain is an injury to a muscle or tendon in the ankle. An ankle strain is a common injury that occurs when the ankle muscle is stretched or torn. A strain is caused by twisting or pulling of the muscle or tendon and may be caused by playing sports, lifting heavy objects or an injury that causes the foot and ankle to twist inward. ...


Read More...

Ankle Ligament Reconstruction

An ankle sprain is a common injury that occurs when the ankle is twisted or turned, and results in torn ligaments within the joint. This injury often causes pain, swelling and bruising, and if it does not heal properly, it may lead to chronic ankle instability or repeated ankle sprains. Ankle ligament reconstruction is a procedure commonly performed on patients experiencing chronic ankle instability and repeated ankles sprains. It is effective in repairing torn ligaments, tightening loosened ligaments and improving the overall stability of the joint. ...


Read More...

Ankle Fracture

An ankle fracture, commonly known as a broken ankle, involves any type of break or crack in the tibia, fibula, or talus. Common causes of an ankle fracture may include a sports injury, a motor vehicle accident or a fall. An ankle fracture can include injury to one or more of the bones that make up the ankle joint. The more bones that are broken, the more complicated and severe the fracture is. Treatment for a broken ankle depends on the type and severity of the individual fracture, but may include wearing a cast or brace, applying ice and taking anti-inflammatory medication. Stable fractures can usually heal on their own within a few weeks, while more complicated ones may require surgery to reposition the broken bone. ...


Read More...

Ankle Dislocation

An ankle dislocation can occur when a significant amount of force is placed on the joint, resulting in an abnormal flexing that shifts the bones in the ankle from their normal positions. An ankle dislocation is often the result of a sports injury caused by physical contact or by quick pivots to change direction. Prompt medical attention to determine whether the blood supply to the foot has been compromised is essential. ...


Read More...

Ankle Arthroscopy FAQs

What is arthroscopy?

Arthroscopy is a minimally invasive procedure used to diagnose and treat injuries and abnormalities within the joints. The arthroscopy procedure is less invasive than traditional surgery and allows the doctor to view and repair joints without making a large incision. Only a small incision is need for an arthroscopy and small instruments are guided by a tiny camera that transmits images onto a computer screen. Accurate diagnosis and precise surgical treatment may be performed using the arthroscopy method. ...


Read More...

Advanced Wound Care and Dressings

Many patients with skin ulcers, burns and other types of wounds face difficulty with the healing process, especially patients who are diabetic. There are several different treatment options available for wounds resistant to conventional therapies. Some of these may include creams, ointments, synthetic skin grafts and other therapies that promote natural healing within the skin to avoid wound complications. ...


Read More...

Achilles Tendonitis

Achilles tendonitis (also tendinitis) is an inflammation of the Achilles tendon, the strong band of tissue that connects the calf muscle to the heel. This condition occurs when excessive stress is put on the tendon. Achilles tendonitis is usually a painful but short-lived condition. It not treated, however, Achilles tendonitis can increase the risk of Achilles tendon rupture, a serious injury requiring immediate medical attention. Most cases of Achilles tendonitis can be prevented by beginning an exercise regimen slowly, with preparation, and by increasing an exercise program gradually and with care. ...


Read More...

Achilles Tendon Rupture

The Achilles tendon is the strong band of tissue that connects the calf muscle to the heel. If stretched too far, the tendon can tear, or rupture, causing severe pain in the ankle and lower leg that can make it difficult or even impossible to walk. An Achilles tendon rupture, which may be partial or complete, often occurs as a result of repeated stress on the tendon while playing sports such as soccer or basketball. Although frequently resulting from the same stresses that cause Achilles tendonitis, a rupture of the Achilles tendon is a far more serious injury, usually requiring surgical repair. ...


Read More...

Accessory Navicular Bone Syndrome

Some patients are born with an extra bone, known as an accessory navicular bone, located on the inside of the foot just above the arch. In many cases, this extra bone causes no problem and requires no treatment, but in some patients it may enlarge, causing pain, particularly during or after walking or athletic activity. Patients affected in this way are said to have accessory navicular bone syndrome. They present with a red, swollen protrusion in the middle of the foot that may cause them to limp. Patients with accessory navicular bone syndrome may also develop plantar fasciitis, bunions or heel spurs. Most often, accessory navicular bone syndrome can be treated nonsurgically, but occasionally surgical intervention is necessary. ...


Read More...


Back to top